After The New York Times Declares It The ‘Age Of The Twink,’ People Are Sounding Off

In a recent piece in The New York Times, writer Nick Haramis laments about a scene from Call Me By Your Name

Haramis points out the physical features of Elio, played by Timothee Chalamet, describing him as “five inches shorter” than his love interest, played by Armie Hammer, with “naturally smooth’ skin and a “pronounced clavicle” and “concave torso.” 

According to Haramis, Chalamet is the “ultimate twink.”

Thus starts his article focused solely on the concept of the twink, where the phrase came from, and how he wholeheartedly believes the “Age of the Twink” has arrived. 

And the reaction was, well, mixed.

The negative reactions to Haramis’ declaration that we’re living in an “Age of Twinks” is pretty strong. 

Where Haramis seems to take a misstep in his piece is relating “twink” to straight men. As @somehowitspaul points out, “Twink is a gay word!!!!! Straight people can’t be twinks!!!! They’re just skinny!!!”

Author of I Can’t Date Jesus, Michael Arceneaux, also writes, “I’m a bit perplexed at using the term ‘twink’ and applying it to mostly straight men to applaud them for nonbinary aesthetics that arguably have not only been done before but with even more vigor by folks like Prince.”

Haramis is sure to make a few enemies, especially as he essentially describes the opposite of a twink as “lumbering, abusive oafs.” As @Emmylanepotter points out, the article is a step in the wrong direction and promotes body dysmorphia within the gay community.

Then again, there are those looking on the bright side fo things. @MattRogersTho is ecstatic about the “Age of Twinks,” tweeting “FINALLY young, thin, attractive and hairless men are getting THEIR DAY!”

But Grindr may have won the “Age of Twink” reaction tweet sweepstakes with this gem:

Although this throwback to 2016 was a close second:

H/T: Twitter, The New York Times