4,000-Year-Old Egyptian Tomb Now Open To Public For First Time Since Its 1940 Discovery 😮

The Tomb of Mehu was discovered in 1940. However, the archaeological site, located in a necropolis near the Pyramid of Giza, has been off limits to visitors since its discovery 78 years ago.

But on Saturday it was announced…

The first photos that emerged were stunning…

The tomb dates back to the 6th Dynasty, which reigned over the ancient empire of Egypt from approximately 2345 – 2181 BC. It is said to contain the remains of Vizier Mehu, one of the highest ranking advisors to the Pharaoh Pepi I. It was originally discovered and excavated by Egyptologist Zaki Saad. Not only does the tomb contain Vizier Mehu, but it also contains his son Meren Ra and grandson Heteb Kha. Pepi’s reign was marked by major Egyptian encrosion into Nubia, which covered parts of modern day Sudan.

People were thrilled for this glimpse into the ancient world…

People couldn’t believe how vibrant it still was…

And of course, there were jokes about curses…

Luckily, Zaki Saad, who led the original excavation, lived for another 42 years. So, it seems we’re safe from curses.

H/T: Twitter, Discovering Egypt, Express