Tess Holliday Just Shut Victoria’s Secret Exec All The Way Down In Instagram Post

The annual Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show will be broadcast on ABC Sunday, December 2, 2018.

As is the case every year, the event attracted controversy over its “lack of inclusivity” among the models who will be showing off the brand’s hottest looks. 2018’s lack of models with different body shapes and races became especially noticeable, however, due to offensive comments made by chief marketing officer, Ed Razek.

In a recent interview for Vogue, Razek doubled down on Victoria’s Secret’s long tradition of choosing models of a very specific body type: tall, thin with ample breasts, aged 18-30 and most likely white. This has long been thought of as the “Victoria’s Secret Bombshell” build.

But in an age where Instagrammers and young models are putting more and more emphasis on diversity and body acceptance and with drops in profits, the question was posed whether the VS Fashion Show should branch out to appeal to a broader customer base.

When the subject was broached with Razek, he first spoke of the hate received by the brand and its current models.

Then Razek took a tangent into how Victoria’s Secret does offer many different sizes in its stores, “30A up to a 40DDD,” but how there was little interest in seeing anything but the status quo on television:

“We invented the plus-size model show in what was our sister division, Lane Bryant. Lane Bryant still sells plus-size lingerie, but it sells a specific range, just like every specialty retailer in the world sells a range of clothing. As do we.”

“We market to who we sell to, and we don’t market to the whole world… We attempted to do a television special for plus-sizes [in 2000]. No one had any interest in it, still don’t.”

Obviously, nothing has changed since 2000.

When asked whether VS had considered transgender models for its show, he said the idea had been mulled over, but ultimately shot down:

“It’s like, why doesn’t your show do this? Shouldn’t you have transsexuals in the show? No. No, I don’t think we should. Well, why not? Because the show is a fantasy. It’s a 42-minute entertainment special.”

Obviously, many popular models took offense to the idea that no one was interested in them or that they couldn’t be included in a fantasy because they didn’t match Victoria’s Secret’s strict body-shape guidelines.

One notable dissenter was plus-sized Instagram model Tess Holliday, who wrote:

“Who needs VS anyway?! They never supported plus ladies & now they are trying to dis my trans sisters? Hell nah. Kiss my fat ass.”

Holliday went on to add:

“I said this to @[Teen Vogue] this week: ‘As much as I want VS, who’s the biggest lingerie retailer, to embrace plus size and more diverse body types, it’s also important to give your time, focus, and money to brands who are actually doing what you want to see. It’s important to be vocal about the brands you do like and what they’re doing right because that’s who should get our money because they actually care about marginalized groups. Always support progressive brands’.”

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Who needs VS anyway?! They never supported plus ladies & now they are trying to dis my trans sisters? Hell nah. Kiss my fat ass. I said this to @teenvogue this week: “As much as I want VS, who’s the biggest lingerie retailer, to embrace plus size and more diverse body types, it's also important to give your time, focus, and money to brands who are actually doing what you want to see. It’s important to be vocal about the brands you do like and what they’re doing right because that’s who should get our money because they actually care about marginalized groups. Always support progressive brands.” . . I’m wearing @asos on my bum which will always get my money! ✌🏻#effyourbeautystandards #boycottvsfashionshow [image description: black and white photo of Tess’s bum wearing lacy underwear & the second photo is a screenshot of a news article of the CEO of VS pictured with models & the headline reads: “Victoria Secrets execs explain why they don’t use trans or plus size models”]

A post shared by Tess 🥀 (@tessholliday) on

Holliday’s fans echoed her message so all could hear!

Other stars, such as Rihanna and Kendall Jenner, also spoke out against Razeks’ message.

An official apology and a walkback of Razek’s claim they never considered using transgender models was soon posted to Twitter.

Razek apologized if his words “came across as insensitive.”

“My remark regarding the inclusion of transgender models in the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show came across as insensitive. I apologize.”

Then claimed his direct statement that Victoria’s Secret would refuse to cast transgender models was not what he said.

“To be clear, we absolutely would cast a transgender model for the show. We’ve had transgender models come to casting… And like many others, they didn’t make it…But it was never about gender. I admire and respect their journey to embrace who they really are.”

In the interview, Razek stated:

“It’s like, why doesn’t your show do this? Shouldn’t you have transsexuals in the show? No. No, I don’t think we should. Well, why not? Because the show is a fantasy. It’s a 42-minute entertainment special.”

For now at least, Razek’s apology is only for his words that “came across as insensitive.”

Sadly, the words were based on a normally unspoken belief of the leadership at Victoria’s Secret, hence the lack of inclusion in their fashion show.

Perhaps, if enough of the public speaks out against that fact, future apologies from men like Razek will be for failing to make their shows more diverse.

H/T – Elite Daily, People, Teen Vogue